Smith, R 4/21/19

Most likely you have heard by now that on Monday, April 15, the famed and historic Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris sustained massive fire damage. At the time I am writing this, no cause of the fire has been determined, nor an official estimate of the damage.

How is humanity responding to the loss? People world-wide have already pledged donations nearing $1 billion to rebuild! The Cathedral had a life, death, and someday a resurrection.

I can’t help but draw a comparison to the Paschal Mystery of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. God is good. People can choose to be good.

PRAYER: Thank you, Jesus, for your freely given gifts of life, death and resurrection. Amen!

~ Rick Smith, Youth Minister

Coady 4/14/19

Holy Thursday’s Mass of the Lord’s Supper, the Good Friday liturgy, and the Easter Vigil form one three-day liturgy, with its public and private moments. The Mass of the Lord’s Supper has an opening song and begins in the normal way, but it does not have a formal ending. People disperse in silence without having been dismissed. The Good Friday liturgy has no formal opening or closing. The Easter Vigil does not have a formal opening, but it ends with a solemn dismissal with the double Alleluia and a rousing Closing Song. In between these public rituals, people are at home or at work, but they hold themselves prayerfully within this long liturgical moment.

The high point of this three-day liturgy is the Easter Vigil at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday. People gather around the Easter Fire for the blessing of the Easter Candle, then move into the Utopia Room for the most solemn Liturgy of the Word of the entire year. There are four Old Testament readings and two New Testament readings. Psalms are sung in between. This is the night when we tell our story. These readings, carefully chosen by the Church and proclaimed on this night since the 4th Century, tell the Narrative of Salvation.

The Easter Vigil is also the Liturgy of Initiation. People will be baptized, confirmed, and receive first Eucharist on that night, becoming one with us in Christ and in the Church, by the power of the Holy Spirit. Witnessing these rites and renewing our own baptismal promises after hearing our story does something for us that no other liturgy can.

Easter Vigil happens at an inconvenient time, and it takes about two hours; however, it is well worth your time. Come prepared to pray, sing, and be renewed. And it will satisfy your Easter obligation. You won’t have to come back the next morning and fight the crowds.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

Coady 4/14/19

Holy Thursday’s Mass of the Lord’s Supper, the Good Friday liturgy, and the Easter Vigil form one three-day liturgy, with its public and private moments. The Mass of the Lord’s Supper has an opening song and begins in the normal way, but it does not have a formal ending. People disperse in silence without having been dismissed. The Good Friday liturgy has no formal opening or closing. The Easter Vigil does not have a formal opening, but it ends with a solemn dismissal with the double Alleluia and a rousing Closing Song. In between these public rituals, people are at home or at work, but they hold themselves prayerfully within this long liturgical moment.

The high point of this three-day liturgy is the Easter Vigil at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday. People gather around the Easter Fire for the blessing of the Easter Candle, then move into the Utopia Room for the most solemn Liturgy of the Word of the entire year. There are four Old Testament readings and two New Testament readings. Psalms are sung in between. This is the night when we tell our story. These readings, carefully chosen by the Church and proclaimed on this night since the 4th Century, tell the Narrative of Salvation.

The Easter Vigil is also the Liturgy of Initiation. People will be baptized, confirmed, and receive first Eucharist on that night, becoming one with us in Christ and in the Church, by the power of the Holy Spirit. Witnessing these rites and renewing our own baptismal promises after hearing our story does something for us that no other liturgy can.

Easter Vigil happens at an inconvenient time, and it takes about two hours; however, it is well worth your time. Come prepared to pray, sing, and be renewed. And it will satisfy your Easter obligation. You won’t have to come back the next morning and fight the crowds.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

Smith, K 4/7/19

I hope that your Lenten journey is going well and has been full of transformation, new revelations, and a deepening of your faith. My own personal relationship with Jesus has become more intimate and I’ve learned the importance of resting fully in God’s love for me.

I’ve also noticed how God has abundantly enriched my relationship with him through this faith community and my friends within it. When I connect with these people, I encounter God. I have found him in my interactions with Fr. Coady, the staff, musicians, parishioners who come for various meetings, community members needing assistance, religious education students, my Lenten faith-sharing group, having coffee or lunch with friends…

When one has an intimate relationship with Jesus and recognizes the presence of God when they connect with others, the celebration of the Mass means so much more. As Catholics, it’s very important that we pray and worship TOGETHER, as a community. Full, conscious, active participation is the Church’s vision for every person who comes to Mass. If each of us has been sustained and enriched by our intimate relationship with God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and by our relationships with each other, then the offering of our active participation in the liturgy will bless not only ourselves, but the entire worshipping community.

Keep preparing your hearts this last week of Lent. Make a choice to be an active participant in the Palm Sunday procession. Let’s immerse ourselves in the Paschal Mystery as we actively participate in the beautiful holy days of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Vigil, and Easter. And may God bless as we continue our journey to him!

~ Kelley Smith, Music Liturgist

Talbot 3/31/19

Giving back to the community is an essential part of the Christian life, and there are many ways to do that. For me, I prefer to do hands on work so that I get to know something directly. Plus, while I can, I enjoy the manual labor. I have seen it help people and touch their lives in a profound way. You can talk to them directly and get to know their stories. This was my thinking recently when I started to volunteer at ReStore Habitat for Humanity. We have helped out this organization before when we did our annual “Go Make A Difference” Service Day, but I had not visited this place before then. I found something out that I think is worthy of note. ReStore is a warehouse full of items that people can purchase to fill their houses. There are all kinds of things like cabinets, washers, dryers, windows, carpet, doors, paint, lights, and so much more. People donate these items and then ReStore sells them at a reduced price to people who have lost things in fires, floods, and other disasters. What is neat is the realization that these are items we take for granted until we are without them. It allows people who have experienced property loss to find something to hold them over until they can get established again. Anyone can go there and purchase items as well. It reminds me of a year round Parish Garage Sale! It is open on Thursday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. So, if you have items that you are looking to give away and can’t wait for the garage sale, you might consider this option. They will come pick it up. It is full of good people who give of their time to help others in a tangible way. The great part is you are helping local people. This is just an example of the many ways Manhattan gives back to those in need. It took me awhile to find this out, but I am glad that I did.

~ Dcn Wayne Talbot

Coady 3/24/19

The Diocese of Salina will be publishing on Friday, March 29, the names of priests who have substantiated or credible allegations of sexual abuse of minors made against them since the year 1900. “Credible allegation” means there is a reasonable certainty that the accusation is true and that the sexual abuse of a minor has occurred. The names will be published in the diocesan newspaper which every registered household receives, as well as on the diocesan website. Many of the priests on the list are deceased, but not all. Many had already been exposed as abusers, but some of the names will be new.

Also in the diocesan newspaper, the Midwest province of the Capuchins will be releasing the names of priests and brothers who have credible allegations of sexual abuse of minors against them. The publication of names is following the national effort to be more transparent as well as accountable.

We had a listening session last fall attended by over 200 people from all three Manhattan parishes. All Manhattan pastors were there, as well as Bishop Vincke. This was a healing moment for those who were present.

This is a painful time for the Church. It can be difficult to withstand the criticisms we receive from those outside the Church. It is also painful to experience disappointment and scandal from our leaders.

Let us together pray for the victims, for their healing and their ability to know Christ’s love despite the spiritual and psychological stress laid upon them. May we all come to know the suffering savior in a deeper way because of this cross we bear together. May we have confidence in knowing that those who die with him also rise with him. May we, along with the victims and even the abusers, experience that resurrection both now and in the life to come.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

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