Coady 10/21/18

The parish has purchased a new piano for the liturgy. This has been on our wish list for awhile. The old one had a cracked sound board, and we limped along with it for several years. It required frequent tuning to keep it sounding acceptable.

Kelley Smith, our Music Liturgist, has done due diligence in finding the best instrument for the money. With the trade-in for the old piano, the new (13 years old, one private owner) concert grand cost $26,000.

We have some donations toward this cost, but the Finance Council has plans for a year-end drive to pay for the rest, similar to the drive we had for the restoration of the pews. We will be telling you more about that in a few weeks. The drive for the pews netted more than we needed, so the extra went into our Capital Reserve fund, which we use to purchase/repair various things that crop up suddenly. If we collect more than we need for the piano, we will reserve the extra for the next big purchase, which will probably be the church air conditioning system. It is original to the building and has been limping along for quite awhile. We would like to get ahead of that so we can replace it next spring before it crashes on us.

I want to say a word of thanks to Kelley and our other organists: Cathy Harmes, Geralyn Tracz, and Mary Guttieri. They have been patient with an instrument that, for several years now, has not sounded true to a musician’s ears.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

Fall Event

MC3:
Three Churches--One Community Connected

Manhattan Catholic Community Connected (MC3) is a cooperative organization consisting of members from the three area churches: St. Thomas More, Seven Dolors, St. Isidore’s.  Join us on Monday, October 29, at 7:00 p.m. in the Utopia Room to hear from Bishop Jerry Vincke.  Light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be available.  Join us for this opportunity to get to know our new bishop and to fellowship with other members of the Catholic community.

Smith, K 10/14/18

The month of October is dedicated to the Holy Rosary. The word “rosary” comes from the Latin word “rosarium” and means a crown or garland of roses. The rose is one of the flowers used to symbolize the Virgin Mary. While the rosary honors and contemplates Mary, it is centered on the entire life of Jesus Christ. We ask for our Holy Mother’s intercession as we focus on the mysteries, which tell the story of the life of Jesus. Through our meditation, contemplation, and prayer, we are changed and begin to imitate Jesus. We are grateful for this gift from Our Lady!

We are also grateful to three other women important to our worship here at St. Thomas More—our accompanists.

Cathy Harmes has played the organ and the piano for us since the early 90s—that’s over 25 years! She plays pretty much every Saturday and some holy days.

Geralyn Tracz began playing the piano and organ here in 1993—that’s 25 years! She has been playing two Sunday mornings a month, plus holy days, for most of that time.

In 2016, we welcomed pianist Mary Guttieri. She also plays one or two Sunday mornings a month and when needed.

All of these women, who have full time jobs, have provided beautiful music and supported our singing through all of our liturgies over the years. We are so thankful for their talent, dedication, and many, MANY hours committed to this parish!

And finally, I am happy to welcome our newest organist/pianist, Ryan Littlejohn, from St. Mary’s Parish in Newton. He is a freshman at K-State and is majoring in Music Education, with an emphasis in Organ Pedagogy.

We thank God for blessing us with all of these wonderful musicians!

~ Kelley Smith, Music Liturgist

Talbot 10/7/18

Wow! We had a great week with the mission talks by Dcn Harold Burke-Sivers. He brought a lot of energy and passion to his presentations. Whether or not you agree with his ideas, you had to admit that there definitely was a fire burning inside. Going to sleep during his talks was not an option. The work of the Evangelization Commission made a lot of this possible. It doesn’t just happen by calling him and waiting for him to come. Over a year ago, the commission discussed various options before coming up with his name. After some careful consideration, plans went into place to set the dates and topics for the mission. It took Father’s approval and the staff was kept informed. As the time got closer, marketing was emphasized with articles in the diocesan paper, our publications, and other churches’ bulletins. The group also worked with the Thomas More Ladies to provide treats every night in the Utopia Room after the talks. We had to work with Dcn Harold on selling his items, making people feel welcome every night, and seeing that childcare was offered. Let us thank the Evangelization Commission and the Thomas More Ladies for making all this possible and putting in the work to make it happen. The Evangelization Commission is made up of Fred Willich, Elizabeth Meagher, Bob Weber, Christy Shaheen, Cheryl Sigle, Dana Suther, Sarah Bradford, Brad Fagan, and Ellen Brockson. There were also members from the Parish Council that helped with various things during the mission and I thank them as well. I also thank the Thom’s Moms for giving us some of their leftover goodies from the bake sale for the receptions. I pray that the spirit of the mission will carry forth from here and the Holy Spirit will inspire new people to get excited about being Catholic!

~ Dcn Wayne Talbot

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Smith, R 9/30/18

I challenge you at the next Mass you attend to LISTEN intently as the Word is proclaimed and NOT read along!

Some of us prefer to see the words as we hear them. Some of us don’t read along…but we don’t really listen intently either. Some of us READ the Word ahead of time and then LISTEN as the Word is proclaimed. This is ideal in my opinion, and actually a big part of what we do each Wednesday in Junior High Youth Ministry.

Holy Scripture is meant to be HEARD. Long before we had written manuscripts that we now call a “Bible” (which is the Hebrew word for “Books”), we had ORAL TRADITION! People did not have the means or education to read and write, but everyone could listen. Legend has it that young scribes studying the Jewish faith had to recite the entire Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy) before they were allowed to ask a single question! Talk about a memory and “learning by ear!”

One has only to think of music to illustrate the difference between reading and hearing the Word. Many song lyrics aren’t catchy or don’t even make sense when read, but apply them to rhythm, notes, and the timbre of the vocalist, and suddenly they work! A classic example of this is Michael Jackson’s song “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin.” (Yes, I am a child of the 70s, but you know the song!) Imagine the producers/musicians first reading Michael’s lyrics: “Mama say, mamu san, a ma mu san” and thinking…WHAT?! But then Michael probably belted the words out for them and added a climactic STOMP, and it suddenly made sense!

I challenge you at the next Mass you attend to LISTEN intently as the Word is proclaimed and NOT read along!

~ Rick Smith, Youth Minister

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