Watts 2/18/18

If you walk down to the end of our education wing, you will see a charming framed cross-stitch of Noah’s Ark.  Young children love the story of the big house boat, the parading pairs of animals, and the colorful rainbow in the sky representing God’s promise.  This story, however, is not just for kids.

I have been familiar with the story of Noah’s Ark since I was a child, but reading it again this week, I discovered two things that I never noticed before.  The first was God made a covenant with Noah AND with all the animals with him.  The Bible says, “I am now establishing my covenant with you and your descendants after you and with every living creature that was with you.”  In verse 9:13, he says, “I set my bow in the clouds to serve as a sign of the covenant between me and the earth.”  The rainbow isn’t just for us humans, but for all the earth and the creatures living therein.  It reminds us of the importance of the web of life and our position as stewards of creation.  How are we doing?  We are in the midst of the 6th great extinction in the history of life on earth and this extinction is manmade.  We have not kept our part of the covenant honoring creation.

The second thing I noticed is that God gave his promise to Noah and family asking nothing in return.  He didn’t demand better behavior, that they always stick to the rules, or offer sacrifices of their best crops to him.  Once again, I am reminded that I am loved, not because I am good, but because God is so good.  I am saved, not because of my actions, but because of God’s grace.

Finally, this reading reminds me that God always wants to restore relationship with us.  The flood provided a fresh start.  The same is true for Lent.  It is a good time to examine our habits, our faith life, and our goals and learn who God is calling us to become.

~ Sherry Watts, K-6 Coordinator

Corned Beef & Cabbage

2018 Applications

pdf Thomas More Ladies Scholarship (79 KB)

The Thomas More Ladies will be awarding two $1,000 scholarships for the 2017-18 academic year to qualified individuals who have been accepted by or are attending a post-secondary, accredited, two or four year technical school, college, or university and are registered parishioners of a Catholic parish within the Manhattan community.  pdf Application Deadline is April 6 (79 KB).

pdf Paul Hinkin Memorial Scholarship (57 KB)

The St. Thomas More Knights of Columbus are now accepting applications for the Paul Hinkin memorial Scholarships.  Two $1,000 scholarships will be awarded.  Council members in good standing and immediate family members, as well as immediate family members of deceased Knights, are eligible.  Members of any registered family of St. Thomas More are also eligible.  Previous recipients may not apply.  pdf Application must be received by close of business on April 6 (57 KB).

Marymount Scholarship

Applicants must be active registered members of a Catholic parish of the Diocese of Salina and must attend a Catholic college full-time.  Application Deadline is July 1.

pdf Msgr. Kruse Scholarship (531 KB)

Applicants must be active registered members of a Catholic parish in the Diocese of Salina.  Applications are available in the parish office.  pdf Application Deadline is July 1 (531 KB).

Scholarships

Thomas More Ladies are offering two $1000 scholarships for the 2018-2019 academic year.

pdf Click HERE for the Application (79 KB).

 

Keep checking here for other Scholarship opportunities!

11 Feb 18

11 Feb 18Podcast
by Fr. Coady
6th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Date: 2/11/18
Click to Listen

Smith, K 2/11/18

The season of Lent begins this Wednesday as we are signed with a across of ashes on our foreheads.  We are physically marked with ashes to remind us that we are dust.  And from dust God has created each of us to be uniquely ourselves, each created for a purpose!

During this year’s Lenten journey, turn to God and allow Him to reveal more of yourself to you, more of who you are in him.  Take that time to fully understand our traditional practices of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving and allow God to transform you through them.

Our parish offers a wide array of Lenten study materials, small faith-sharing groups, Stations of the Cross, reconciliation, adoration…many opportunities for you to learn and grow in your Catholic faith.  Please take advantage of those things.

I also suggest the Best Lent Ever program, where you can sign up for free daily emails from Matthew Kelly of Dynamic Catholic.  This year, each of the emails focuses on a small excerpt from his book “Perfectly Yourself,” which Matthew says is the best book he has written.  Reading these short emails is a great way to check in with yourself and to uncover what purpose God has created for you.

I am studying this book with two wonderful friends—what a blessing!  And I am signed up for the emails.  What are your plans for the 40 days of Lent?  How will you turn to God and allow him to radically transform your life?  Be open to him.

REMINDER:  On Ash Wednesday, there will only be Mass at 7:00 a.m.  ONLY ASHES will be distributed at the 5:15 and 7:00 p.m. services.  There will be NO communion.

~ Kelley Smith, Music Liturgist

AED Training

Ministry Training

Coady 2/4/18

The celebration of the Liturgical Year is always about the Paschal Mystery, that dying and rising pattern that we see in the life of Christ, as well as in the Triune God.  It commemorates the fact that, in God, there is no self-concern, but only the giving of life.  In the complete gift of each person’s self, each receives that same gift from the other two persons.  This is love.  This is the pattern of all life.

We see this in nature.  Plants die in the fall and new life takes their place in the spring, either with new leaves or seedlings.  One generation of people dies so that a new generation can take their place.  Plants give their lives to feed herbivorous animals.  Some animals give their lives to feed carnivorous animals.  Water recycles through evaporation and rain.

Humans have the unique gift of awareness and intentionality.  They can freely join this cycle of life or they can fight against it.  While science and technology have made wonderful advances in fighting disease, weather, and many of the harsh realities of life, they have also given humans the illusion that they can ward off death.

Lent is our annual reminder that surrender to death is actually a good thing.  This is not to say that it is easy—surely, Jesus’ death on the cross was not easy.  But letting go of life is divine.  Life in God (and that is our goal, that is the Kingdom) involves not clinging to life.  That is why Jesus told us that the only way to gain your life is to lose it (Luke 17:33).

Easter is our annual reminder that life given is life received.  Easter celebrates the hope that, just as Christ was raised from the dead, so will be our destiny.  Easter encourages us to give our lives freely rather than simply submit to the inevitable.  Jesus went willingly to the cross.  Death did not simply overtake him.  “No one takes (my life) from me, but I lay it down of my own accord.  I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again” (John 10:18).

The Risen Lord offers us the same freedom.  Lent is the practice of voluntarily laying down our lives.  Easter is the celebration of victory over death: Christ’s and ours.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

Coady 2/4/18

The celebration of the Liturgical Year is always about the Paschal Mystery, that dying and rising pattern that we see in the life of Christ, as well as in the Triune God.  It commemorates the fact that, in God, there is no self-concern, but only the giving of life.  In the complete gift of each person’s self, each receives that same gift from the other two persons.  This is love.  This is the pattern of all life.

We see this in nature.  Plants die in the fall and new life takes their place in the spring, either with new leaves or seedlings.  One generation of people dies so that a new generation can take their place.  Plants give their lives to feed herbivorous animals.  Some animals give their lives to feed carnivorous animals.  Water recycles through evaporation and rain.

Humans have the unique gift of awareness and intentionality.  They can freely join this cycle of life or they can fight against it.  While science and technology have made wonderful advances in fighting disease, weather, and many of the harsh realities of life, they have also given humans the illusion that they can ward off death.

Lent is our annual reminder that surrender to death is actually a good thing.  This is not to say that it is easy—surely, Jesus’ death on the cross was not easy.  But letting go of life is divine.  Life in God (and that is our goal, that is the Kingdom) involves not clinging to life.  That is why Jesus told us that the only way to gain your life is to lose it (Luke 17:33).

Easter is our annual reminder that life given is life received.  Easter celebrates the hope that, just as Christ was raised from the dead, so will be our destiny.  Easter encourages us to give our lives freely rather than simply submit to the inevitable.  Jesus went willingly to the cross.  Death did not simply overtake him.  “No one takes (my life) from me, but I lay it down of my own accord.  I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again” (John 10:18).

The Risen Lord offers us the same freedom.  Lent is the practice of voluntarily laying down our lives.  Easter is the celebration of victory over death: Christ’s and ours.

~ Fr. Frank Coady

28 Jan 18

28 Jan 18Podcast
by Fr. Coady
4th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Date: 1/29/18
Click to Listen

28 Jan 18 Buzz

28 Jan 18 BuzzPodcast
by Don Buzz Harris
4th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Date: 1/29/18
Click to Listen

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